1 Kings 22 and 2 Chron 18

Today we end 1 Kings:

Last week we read about several kings but we ended with Jehosapaht on the side of Judah. (use your visuals)

I don’t want to lose you as the reading gets a little more difficult.  Lots of names here.  Use your “Kings” visuals to help you get through it.  Who is Micaiah?  Let’s look at the whole thing:

When Ahab ruled over Israel and Jehoshaphat over Judah, the two kings decided to come together to attack the city of Ramoth-Gilead to retake it from the Arameans. Before going to battle, they consulted with more than 400 “royally” appointed (not God appointed) counselors of Israel. These were fake prophets who had no regard for correctly delivering the word of the Lord. To please King Ahab and obtain his favor, these prophets only served to tell the king what he wanted to hear.

When you read this last chapter you can view it from a human standpoint “I think that is a great idea Jehoshaphat, making a treaty with Israel to overtake Aram.” OR you can look at it from God’s point of view and maybe see it a little differently.  Even though Jehoshaphat in chapter 17 started a revival for Judah we now see him 3 years later waiting and waiting for Ahab to be killed just like the Lord had promised OR fear Ahab would conquer Aram completely.

The counselors brought before Ahab all prophesied victory in battle, but King Jehoshaphat remained suspicious. He wanted to hear from an independent prophet who would be faithful to the word of the Lord. Ahab offered to seek the counsel of Micaiah but warned Jehoshaphat that he hated this prophet. The reason? Micaiah always predicted evil for Ahab. An evil king will receive bad news from God, so, if Micaiah was true to his calling, he could do nothing but deliver “evil” messages to Ahab. So Ahab hated him.

Standing before the two kings, Micaiah at first sarcastically told Ahab what he wanted to hear, forecasting good news of victory over the Arameans. But Ahab, knowing Micaiah’s sarcasm, made him swear to tell the truth, and Micaiah told the wicked king what God really had to say. The prophet’s report was devastating: “I saw all Israel scattered on the hills like sheep without a shepherd, and the LORD said, ‘These people have no master. Let each one go home in peace’”.

So what happens?  Zedekiah slaps him in the face!

So then what happens??  Micaiah says (I picture it with a smile on his face) “You will find out on the day you go to hide in an inner room.”

Oh no he didn’t say that!  Yes, he did!  😂. Wait, (now I picture him laughing) he ends with “Mark wy words!” (MIC DROP!)

In the end, Elijah’s prophesy comes true and Ahab meets his fate of death and his blood being licked by dogs. (despite the switcharoo plan…you can’t switcharoo on the Lord!)

Overall Jehsaphat was an accomplished leader and considered a “Good King” following the ways of the Lord (except for removing all the “high places” (altars for worship to false gods).


Next on our checklist, we see (look at the visual near top of the post for Judah Kings)

  • Judah King: Jehoram (slipping
  • Israel King: Ahaziah52 He did evil in the eyes of the Lord, because he followed the ways of his father and mother and of Jeroboam son of Nebat, who caused Israel to sin. 53 He served and worshiped Baal and aroused the anger of the Lord, the God of Israel, just as his father had done.

(We know that all the kings on the Israel side are bad)

One thought on “1 Kings 22 and 2 Chron 18

  1. Have we met Zedekiah before this? Was he one of the 400 prophets, or just a different counsel to the king? He stepped in and slapped him…I wonder if Ahab was inviting him to dinner later? 🤣

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s